Oakshott Lipari Blog Hop

Hello! Today is my day on the Oakshott Liparis Blog Hop organised by Lynne from Lily’s Quilts. I feel very flattered that I was chosen to be part of this and would like to thank both Lynne and Michael from Oakshott for letting me play with these beautiful fabrics.

Lipari2016_range_ruched1

The Oakshott Liparis are absolutely gorgeous and can’t truly be described, they have to be seen. Each of the eighteen colours are woven with black thread to give a dark and rich palette. They are 54″ wide so go a lot further than regular quilting cottons which is great as you get quite a lot of fabric in a Fat Eighth bundle. Find out more about the inspiration for this collection here.

The minute I realised that I was going to be part of the blog hop I sat down and designed a quilt.

Persimon QuiltObviously there was no chance of making it with a Fat Eighth bundle so I thought I’d just miniaturise it and make a mini quilt. However, when the fabrics arrived and I started playing with them, I came back to the same colour combination again and again, blue, green and orange, red. I then found it difficult to cut the beautiful Liparis into small strips so decided to keep all the stripes at the same width and make the wallhanging quite big. Because it ended up as a wallhanging, not a quilt as planned it has a backing, some lush Lipari Marina, but no batting and no quilting. I was worried that the batting and quilting would make the wallhanging too rigid and that it then wouldn’t shimmer in the light as much.

This is what I ended up with:

Persimon Quilt 'Heaven and Earth'

The stylised ‘persimon’ are English paper pieced and then appliquéd onto the quilt.

Persimon Quilt 'Heaven and Earth'

This quilt/wallhanging is quite striking but easy to make. I will give you the measurements I used but it would be easy to resize from small to large.

You will need

8 Fat Eighths of Oakshott Lipari for the background, I used Stromboli, Lisca, Dattilo, Lentia, Porticello, Salina, Scari, Volcano Bleu

3 Fat Eighths of Oakshott for the ‘persimon’, I used Milazzo, Basiluzzo and Pollara

1 m of backing fabric, I used Marina

Persimon Templates

Thread for basting and sewing, I use cheap thread for basting and Aurifil for sewing and appliqué.

  1. Cut a 5.5″strip from each of your background fabrics and sew together. I went from deep red to blue to get my heaven and earth feel.
  2. Cut out the templates for the three ‘persimon’, you will need twelve of each shape
  3. Pin the templates onto your chosen fabric, cut out with a 0.25″ seam allowance and thread baste onto the paper template. P1020327
  4. Sew the small triangular shapes onto the big wedge shape, then sew the wedge shapes together to get a ‘persimon’. Pollara Persimon
  5. Lay the ‘persimon’ onto your background and pin into place. I ironed a line into the background about 8.5″ from the edge and centred my ‘persimon’ on it. Pin into place leaving the papers in.
  6. Appliqué the ‘persimon’ onto the background with small stitches starting with the inside. Once they are sewn on it’s easy to take the papers out of the small and big shape before pinning the outside down again and sewing around.
  7. Trim your top to get nice clean edges. Mine ended up at 25.5″ x 40.5″.
  8. Lay out your backing fabric and lay your top face down onto it. sew around with a 0.25″ seam allowance leaving an 8″ gap so you can turn it inside out. Press well and close the gap with a ladder stitch.
  9. To hang, I sewed a bamboo stick onto the backing.

You could of course also quilt and bind it the traditional way.

Persimon Quilt Heaven and Earth

The Oakshotts look different in different lights, they are absolutely fascinating. I’ve hung my  ‘Heaven and Earth’ wallhanging over my bed and I love how goes from very dark to shimmering like a jewel depending on the time of day.

Persimon Quilt Heaven and Earth

I’ve absolutely loved working with the Oakshott Liparis!

5 May     Allison Dutton       allison-sews.blogspot.com
10 May   Nicholas Ball         quiltsfromtheattic.wordpress.com 
12 May   Helen Purvis          archiethewonderdog.blogspot.com
17 May   Lynn Harris            thelittleredhen.typepad.com
19 May   Kitty Wilkin           nightquilter.com (Now moved to 2nd June)
24 May   Jessica Skultety      www.quiltyhabit.com 
26 May   Karin Jordan           www.leighlaurelstudios.com
31 May   Elisabeth Vaughan  sharksdinner.com

The ‘Not Going Anywhere’ Pin Cushion

I’ve shown you my newest pin cushion earlier and now I’m giving you a little tutorial on the improved version (or take three, as I call it). I have to apologise for the quality of the pictures; it was a dark and rainy day today. I wonder where the summer scampered off to as it most definitely has skipped Switzerland this year.

1. Decide on the size you would like your pin cushion to be. I wanted mine to be a little bit narrower than the width of my machine which is about 4.5″ so I settled for 4.25″. I also wanted my pin cushion to not take up too much space and decided that I wanted it to be 2.5″ high. I then added 0.5″ seam allowance and ended up with a rectangle 4.75″ x 5.5″ (4.25 + 0.5 = 4.75 / 2.5 x 2 + 0.5 = 5.5).

Pin Cushion Tutorial

2. I pieced my pin cushion but that isn’t necessary. I’m sure it would look great made in one print too. If you are piecing your pin cushion remember that you won’t be able to see the back so don’t put a treasured scrap at the top or bottom of your rectangle (guess how I know?!).

Pin Cushion Tutorial

3. Sew the short sides together leaving a gap in the middle so you can turn your pin cushion inside out later.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

4. For the ties measure around the side bit of your machine. As you can see my total is 22.5″. Now subtract the width of your pin cushion, then add 3″ for seam allowance and overlap then divide all of it by two. In my case that is (22.5 – 4.25 + 3 ) : 2 = 10.625. I decided to round up to 11″. I cut the fabric for my ties 2″ x 11″, folded in 0.5″ on one side, then folded it lengthwise in half and pressed it well. Then I folded the outer edges into the centre crease and pressed again giving me a tie which is 0.5″ wide. Top stitch close to the edge.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

5. Pin the ties onto the sides of your pin cushion about 0.5″ from the top.

Pin cushion Tutorial

To make sure that you don’t catch the ties in the seam poke them through the gap in the back of your pin cushion.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

6. Sew down the sides of your pin cushion. Clip the corners and turn it inside out.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

7. Fill your pin cushion with poly fill and sew the gap closed with a whip stitch or ladder stitch. Pin Cushion Tutorial8. Hold your pin cushion in place and mark where you need to put your popper or velcro to give a nice tight fit. I used a turquoise popper.

Pin Cushion Tutorial I added 4″ when I calculated the length of the ties but realised it was more than I really needed and this is why I changed it to 3″ in this tutorial.

9. If you’d like to add a little scissor holder, you need to mark where on the tie you’d like to put it.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

10. Cut a piece of fabric 1.5″ x 2″. Fold it in half, press, then fold the edges into the centre and press again to give you a piece that is 0.5″ x 1.5″ big. Top stitch close to the edge. Fold about 0.25″ in on both sides, pin onto your tie and sew close to the edge.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

Attach your pin cushion to your machine and get sewing.

Pin Cushion Tutorial

If you have any questions regarding this tutorial, please don’t hesitate to ask (This tutorial was written while I was sitting on the sofa with a nasty cold feeling very sorry for myself and not thinking clearly so I might have to edit it a bit once I’m feeling better).

 

Modern Churn Dash: A Quick How-To

While I was sewing my churn dash quilt, a Dashing Echo, I always thought of it as a ‘modern churn dash’ and somehow this name stuck. The churn dash block is a traditional block and I love the look of it. Changing it up a bit felt a little strange but I love the new look. When I showed my quilt on the blog I was asked if I could write a little how-to for it and I’m happy to oblige.

Modern Churn Dash

I’m sorry to say that I cannot remember how much of the background fabric I used but  believe I started with two meters and had some left over. For the churn dashes I used 10 different fat quarters.

Cutting

  • Background: 15 x (8.5″ x 8.5″) and 32 x (4.5″ x 8.5″)
  • Five whole churn dashes: 2 x (9″ x 9″) cut diagonally and 4 x (4.5″ x 8.5″)
  • Two 3/4 churn dashes: 1 x (9″ x 9″) cut diagonally and 2 x (4.5″ x 8.5″)
  • two half churn dashes: 1 x (9″ x 9″) cut diagonally and 1 x (4.5″ x 8.5″)
  • Four 1/4 churn dashes: 1 x (9″ x 9″) cut diagonally and 1 x (4.5″ x 8.5″) Note: you only need one of the triangles

Once you’ve cut all your fabrics lay out your churn dashes starting with the one in the centre.

Modern Churn Dash

The difference between the traditional churn dash and this version is that it’s not sewn in blocks but in rows. The pattern is a repeat of four different rows. My quilt is constructed from nine rows; rows 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1.

Modern Churn Dash Row

Each row can be split up into blocks.

Modern Churn Dash Blocks

Sewing

  • Sew the half square triangles (HSTs) making sure you do not jumble up the colours. Pick two triangles from the first row, sew together and press. I like to press the seams open. Trim to 8.5″ x 8.5″, put them back in the correct place and grab the next pair. Sew all the HSTs together.
  • Now sew together the rectangles. They consist of one background rectangle and one coloured one and can therefore easily be chain pieced. Press and put back in the correct place.
  • Sew the blocks into rows.
  • Sew the rows together.
  • Baste, quilt and bind your quilt.
  • Snuggle!

And if you turn the blocks sewn from rectangles 180 degrees you end up with some positive doughnuts

Positive Doughnut

If you have any questions regarding this how-to please don’t hesitate to ask.

 

 

In The Woods

I was playing around with TouchDraw, a brilliant app for the iPad that lets you draw patterns and design wonderful things. Thinking about Le Challenge (this month is ‘Geometrics’) I designed an easy geometric English Paper Pieced block, got a some lovely fabrics in muted spring-like colours and started stitching.

Tuesday was a lovely day here in Cambridgeshire so Little Miss Bossy-Boots and I spent it outside in the garden. While she was running around, climbing up and down the slide and playing with her toy kitchen (making yucky stews from leaves, flowers and some water) I took my scraps and paper pieces and got busy.

EPP in the GardenI showed my progress on Instagram that evening.

In the Woods ProgressAnd then finished it yesterday evening.

In the Woods FinishedEagle-eyed people might have noticed that I had to take the centre out and tilt it by 45 degrees. Actually I tilted it quite a bit more as I fell in love with the little hedgehog and wanted him at the top. Little Miss Bossy-Boots asked me to turn it into a quilt for her dolls. I was going to use it for a pocket on a tote but might turn into ‘nice mum’ and make it into a little doll quilt.

Anyway, in the end I decided not to use it for Le Challenge. I’ve designed a different piece which I’m going to make totally out of solids. I’ll post a sneak peek once I get going.

Interested in using the templates/paper pieces I designed? Click here to download In The Woods.